Shibori

Dyed samples on cotton and silk using different methods

Nui Shibori uses stitching to create intricately dyed patterns. After a design is stitched in to the fabric, the threads are pulled tight and are tied together. The part of the fabric that is stitched remains undyed.

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Nui Shibori on cotton

11.8" x  9.8"

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Nui Shibori on silk

11" x 8.5"

Itajime shibori is a shape-resist technique where the cloth is sandwiched between two pieces of wood, which prevents the dye from penetrating the fabric they cover.

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Itajime Shibori on cotton

8" x 8"

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Itajime Shibori on silk

10" x 10"

In Arashi Shibori, the cloth is folded or twisted around a pole. String is wound around the fabric on the pole tightly and then the fabric is compressed along the pole. 

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Arashi Shibori on silk

20" x 4"

Kanoko Shibori, also known as "Tie and dye" involves gathering the fabric into sections and tying them with string. The tied up fabric remains undyed. 

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Kanoko Shibori on cotton

9" x 9"

Kumo shibori involves wrapping sections of the fabric around objects and tying them with string.

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Kumo Shibori on cotton

8.5" x 8.5"